A woman in Seattle called police complaining a drone was hovering outside her apartment complex and possibly peeping in on her. As admirers of attractive women, we can definitely understand the temptation, but how did she know what the drone was doing? Is her paranoia justified?Drones may soon be used by police for surveillance. News outlets want drones to report on fires, hostage situations, sporting events and more. The ability for government or paparazzi to spy on us scares people. But look at what else they can do:

  • film live events (like large concerts or intimate weddings)
  • help people follow sporting events like marathons or cycle races
  • asses property value (my co-worker witnessed a real estate appraiser doing this)
  • scare away geese and other pests from public areas
  • herd sheep or cattle
  • take a census of endangered animals
  • survey pristine wilderness areas
  • product delivery (Amazon famously floated this idea recently)
  • aid emergency responders (by delivering medicines or blood samples)
  • spraying crops

In short, drones are freaking awesome. They're not going away.

So how do we address these concerns over voyeurism? You know TMZ wants one and you know what for. So does Homeland Security -- and you know what for.