For years, society has believed that men compete for sex, and women do not. Over the years, research has surfaced to prove this to be false. Women do compete, just in completely different (sometimes malicious) ways than men. Now, let's talk about our focal point: sluts.

Who invented the slut? It's been long believed that men created the slut during primitive times in our history. Cavemen would seek out women other than their mates for "some on the side". So, men created the role of a slut. Sex is a resource, and women supply it.

Flickr, xinem

"Slut-shaming" has been often blamed on men who used it to keep their spouse from cheating or leaving them. However, research suggests that it is women who "slut-shame". Check this out "...Evidence favors the view that women have worked to stifle each other's sexuality because sex is a limited resource that women use to negotiate with men, and scarcity gives women an advantage."

Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt wanted to test the idea of female vs. female aggression by sending a girl into a school environment. The first go-around, she was dressed averagely, in a t-shirt and jeans. The other girls hardly noticed her.

When she dressed in a more revealing shirt and small skirt, girls looked her up and down, rolled their eyes, and even said "What the **** is that?". When she left the room, it only became worse as the girls suggested she wanted to sleep with the professor. Another girl said that her breasts "were about to pop out".

This form of indirect aggression is more commonly found in young women and adolescents. Studies have also suggested that young girls who are more attractive are more likely to be targeted.

Flickr, Bratislavsky kraj

Dr. Vaillancourt says that, “Women are indeed very capable of aggressing against others, especially women they perceive as rivals. The research also shows that suppression of female sexuality is by women, not necessarily by men.”

So who invented the slut? Men did. They supply a demand. Women identified sluts, and identified them as being a bad thing.

Sources: New York Times, The Royal Society, PsychNET