Regardless of Snowmageddon in February, it's the snowpack in Cascades and elsewhere, and reservoir levels that determine what water will look like irrigation wise this year, and every year.

Kennewick Irrigation District, and others, are now saying the water levels are dropping when it comes to percentage of what is needed to deliver 'normal' or healthy levels. They now say it's down to about 75% of normal.

As of the beginning of may data from snowpacks and reservoir levels indicate this could be another dry summer for the Tri-Cities. And to make matters more difficult, the KID and several other area districts are considered 'junior' when it comes to water rights--that means they're the newest.  And if you're junior, you stand in line and others may get priority if levels get bad.

KID and other officials urge residents to be careful and specific when watering. target areas carefully, and monitor your water. Don't just turn it on and leave it for hours and hours.  Every bit saved will help later this summer.

They also recommend drip lines, soaker hoses and micro spray systems which are said to be very effective and save water.