If you're out camping, hiking, hunting or just out exploring in the woods or rural areas and suddenly you come across something with purple paint on it, police say you need to leave.

In some states, the law is called the "Purple Paint Law". The purple paint is the legal equivalent to a "No Trespassing" sign.

Why doesn't Washington do this?

Across America, the states that have official "Purple Paint Laws" include: Kansas, Arizona, Montana, Indiana, Arkansas, Idaho, Florida, Maine, Louisiana, North Carolina, Missouri, Texas and Illinois.

The reason is simple: landowners, particularly in rural areas, have to continually replace printed signs that often end up being stolen or end up worn out and badly faded by the elements.

Purple paint is chosen because it sticks out, and even people who are colorblind can usually see the color purple.

In most states, the law requires that the purple paint should be in vertical lines, no less than eight inches wide and at least three feet above ground.

Shout out to the hunters: Have you ever come across purple paint to mark a property around here?

Despite the fact it's a Husky color, in Cougar country, is this a good idea for us in Washington?