While we aren't expecting snow for Christmas, we are expecting a warmer than normal holiday. In fact, temperatures will be in the 40's for the Tri-Cities.

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And then...dangerously cold weather is expected to arrive to the Pacific Northwest next week.

The coldest days are predicted for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, with many overnight low predictions are for single digits. Forecasters warn that wind chills below zero are possible. Temperatures in higher elevations like Pendleton and Yakima may dip even lower.

Some people enjoy the cold. I do not. I left Minnesota and Illinois years ago for the warmth of the West. The only thing I enjoy about cold temperatures and snow would be snowmobiling.

man speeding on a snowmobile
treasurephoto
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I haven't been in years. It was one activity I looked forward to in a 2020 move to Duluth, Minnesota. (What was I thinking?) I lasted 5 months. The Pandemic hit. The HUGE fundraising snowmobile event I looked forward to taking part in was canceled. Everything was.

baramee2554
baramee2554
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Thank goodness I got the opportunity to return to Tri-Cities. In the few years I have lived here, Mother Nature provided several inches of snow a couple of times.

ablokhin
ablokhin
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Cold weather is an inconvenience. You have to prepare for it. It takes time. And, I don't enjoy driving on icy roads. I do enjoy a smooth commute to and from work.

Man shoveling snow close up. Man cleaning snow from sidewalk in front of house.
Tutye
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Maybe, if I owned a snowmobile, I might enjoy winter. Although, I would need SNOW, too. However, that's why I moved from the Midwest. I don't enjoy shoveling snow. Do you?

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