A  home was demolished by fire Tuesday night in Yakima. Firefighters responded to the blaze in the 600 block of North 20th Avenue.

The fire was reported by multiple callers including neighbors at 9:32 pm.

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As Yakima Fire Department crews arrived on the scene, they found the front half of the home fully engulfed. The fire was reported in the attic all along the length of the house. As a result, several power lines were down near the blaze.

Additional crews were called from the Yakima Training Center Fire Department and East Valley Fire Department. However, efforts to bring the fire under control proved too much for the 44 firefighters who responded. The fire was threatening neighboring homes.

According to a release from the Yakima Fire Department:

City of Yakima Public Works Division crews were called to the scene. They assisted with a backhoe, clearing portions of the structure. YFD crews were on the scene for about five and a half hours.

Yakima firefighters were back on the scene Wednesday after receiving reports that the fire was smoldering.

The house was deemed a total loss. The dollar amount of the destruction is estimated at $275,000. The occupant made it out safe and is staying with family in the area.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

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