For decades the Department of Social and Health Services office in Kennewick, which served much of the Tri-Cities, has been located at 1120 North Edison; just south of the intersection with Canal.

DSHS has announced that after four years in the planning stages, they will relocate to their newer building April 5th. The new venue is at 6909 Crosswind  Boulevard, a complex of buildings just east of the Benton Franklin Health District, and on the west side of The Garden Tri Cities Church. It's near the intersection of Crosswinds and the roundabout on Oakanogan.

Much of the heavy lifting has already been done. After the building on Edison closed to clients in 2020 due to COVID restrictions the computer and phone systems and other infrastructure was moved to the newer location.

According to DSHS:

"Offices moving to the new location are the Community Services OfficeDivision of Child Support and the Office of Fraud and Accountability, none of whose clients should expect a disruption in service."

During the relocation process that started four years ago, officials were looking for a state owned building that could accomodate all of the needs of the department; including meeting the in person appointments and foot traffic.

However, none were available that met their needs, which included enough lobby space to accomodate all customers once it was safe to open, as well as six parking lot stalls set aside for electric vehicles.

About the new structure, DSHS said;

"The building includes several features that protect the environment and provide savings through the addition of 75 solar panels, estimated to produce 36,000 KWH per year as well as LED lighting installed throughout the interior and exterior of the building."

The old location already has a for sale realty sign in front, as the state is looking for find a new owner. Again, the old office will close for good April 2. 

 Although the building is looking to be sold for a new tenant, here's a look at some places where people moved out, and never came back.

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