I've been sitting on this for a week because I didn't want to be the spoiler guy, but the box office pundits swear the Freddie Mercury biopic, "Bohemian Rhapsody" will not be the top movie again this week in America. So I would like to focus on one specific kind-of-a-spoiler-alert thing.

Queen's Brian May and Roger Taylor had final say on everything in this movie. Dramatic license allows, I guess, for a little fudging on the facts, and to conveniently tie up all the loose ends for story brevity purposes near the end, but one huge time burp can't be ignored.

When Queen's "Keep Yourself Alive" was featured in the film, it properly captured what the song was all about at the time. It didn't do very well chart wise, but everyone was blown away by Brian May's opening guitar shredding and Freddie Mercury's muscular vocals.

It was at this point in the movie, after releasing just one album, the debut Queen, the band knew they had something special and they decided to go big and go all the way and that meant going to America, which they did.

Remember, at this point, in 1973, and in the movie, the band had not yet recorded an under performing second album, Queen II, nor Sheer Heart Attack, or even A Night at the Opera, the album where you'll find "Bohemian Rhapsody", which is the next major plot point in the movie after the obligatory shots of concert gigs and stages with swooshing fonts of where the band played in cities all across the U.S.A.

And the song on the soundtrack during this montage is "Fat Bottomed Girls", from 1978's Jazz. Literally, they skipped over 5 albums to feature a song that was not to be recorded for 5 years.

Seriously, I get that nothing from Queen II would have worked, but "Killer Queen" or "Stone Cold Crazy" from Sheer Heart Attack? Nothing from A Day at the Races? ("Tie Your Mother Down")

Something other than "We Will Rock You/We Are the Champions" from News of the World"?

Much ado about nothing. I got over it quickly.

I highly recommend the movie, oh mamma mia let me go, because the music is not compromised. Even rockers that are long forgotten like "Hammer to Fall", and the impromptu crowd fist pumping to "Radio Ga-Ga" are featured during the amazing Live Aid re-creation sequence. Come on time and be prepared to pay attention as the opening 20th Century Fox film fanfare roll to bring on the movie has a rip-snorting shred twist courtesy of May and Taylor. That screaming Queen rendition of the 20th Century Fox theme will give you goose bumps.